Wednesday, January 2, 2013

art-of-swords:

English Heavy Cavalry Officer Dress Sword

  • Dated: 1796 

The dress sword for Heavy Cavalry officers is a much smaller and lighter weapon, having a knucklebow, ovoid pommel and boat-shell guard in gilt brass or gunmetal than the oval disk saber used by the heavy cavalry on the battlefield.

The dress sword usually had a leather scabbard with gilt brass mounts, however, a number of examples exist of swords with iron service scabbards, suggesting that some officers may have employed the dress sword in the field.

In this case, the blade of the sword is much shorter and narrower than the service sword’s, and usually double edged with a short narrow central fuller each side. It is etched and gilt at the forte with martial trophies, folia.

Also is featured the cipher of King George III “GR” and “Dieu et mon droit”. The grip is covered with a silver beautiful complicated wire. The leather scabbard is engraved at the back “Prosser Charing Cross London”

  • Sidenote: “Dieu et mon droit” means “God and my right” and is the motto of the British monarch. The expression appears on a scroll beneath the shield of the coat of arms of the United Kingdom. It refers to the divine right of the Monarch to govern and is said to have first been adopted as the royal motto of England by King Henry V in the 15th century.

Source & Copyright: Swords Collection

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

art-of-swords:

Alexander Davison Sword-pistol

  • Alexander Davison was Admiral Lord Nelson’s friend

A sword-pistol once owned by a close friend of Admiral Lord Nelson was auctioned in Staffordshire. The weapon, which belonged to Alexander Davison, was recently on display at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

Cuttlestones, which is auctioning the weapon at Penkridge said it expected the sword-pistol to sell for £10,000 to £15,000. The weapon’s current owner Fred Pritchard. The weapon, which has a 65cm [25in] sword blade attached, was made by firearms manufacturer HW Mortimer in 1805.

Source: BBC History © 2012

Thursday, December 20, 2012
chailatteplease:

Smallsword in musketeer style, c. 1765. Made by Master J.F. Senckeysen and J.J. Dörfer in Strasbourg Germany. Steel, leather, various fabric, and silver guard and handle.

chailatteplease:

Smallsword in musketeer style, c. 1765. Made by Master J.F. Senckeysen and J.J. Dörfer in Strasbourg Germany. Steel, leather, various fabric, and silver guard and handle.

Sunday, December 16, 2012
maehymn:

Love is a needle not used for sewing.

maehymn:

Love is a needle not used for sewing.

Monday, November 5, 2012
art-of-swords:

Swords
Infantry Officer’s Sword, 1796
Swept-Hilt Rapier, c.1600
Prussian Officer’s Sword, 1878

Source: All Posters

art-of-swords:

Swords

  • Infantry Officer’s Sword, 1796
  • Swept-Hilt Rapier, c.1600
  • Prussian Officer’s Sword, 1878

Source: All Posters

Sunday, October 28, 2012

art-of-swords:

English Heavy Cavalry Officer Dress Sword

  • Dated: 1796 

The dress sword for Heavy Cavalry officers is a much smaller and lighter weapon, having a knucklebow, ovoid pommel and boat-shell guard in gilt brass or gunmetal than the oval disk saber used by the heavy cavalry on the battlefield.

The dress sword usually had a leather scabbard with gilt brass mounts, however, a number of examples exist of swords with iron service scabbards, suggesting that some officers may have employed the dress sword in the field.

In this case, the blade of the sword is much shorter and narrower than the service sword’s, and usually double edged with a short narrow central fuller each side. It is etched and gilt at the forte with martial trophies, folia.

Also is featured the cipher of King George III “GR” and “Dieu et mon droit”. The grip is covered with a silver beautiful complicated wire. The leather scabbard is engraved at the back “Prosser Charing Cross London”

  • Sidenote: “Dieu et mon droit” means “God and my right” and is the motto of the British monarch. The expression appears on a scroll beneath the shield of the coat of arms of the United Kingdom. It refers to the divine right of the Monarch to govern and is said to have first been adopted as the royal motto of England by King Henry V in the 15th century.

Source & Copyright: Swords Collection

Thursday, October 11, 2012

art-of-swords:

German Transitional Smallsword

  • Dated: 17th/18th century
  • Measurements: overall length 35”

Brass hilt featuring symmetrical bilobate shell guard, decorative pas d’ane, and squared knucklebow. Oblong pommel with flattened sides, featuring grotesque masks and human figures in relief. Fine spiral grip wrap of twisted iron and brass wire with braided turks heads top and bottom.

Hexagonal-section 28 1/4” blade with ricasso marked with gilded Prussian Eagle and “BERLIN” on both sides, probably of the 18th C. The style of the knucklebow, pommel, and grip are typical of late 17th century transitional swords, but the shorter blade with gilt markings likely from the 18th century. 

Source & Copyright: Antique Weapon Store

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

notactuallythor:

The Wallace Collection: A selection of Rapiers

Sunday, September 16, 2012
art-of-swords:

The Burne Sword
Swordsmith: Richard Johnston
Place and date of manufacture: English, London
Dated: 1807–9
Presented to Colonel Robert Burne by the officers of the 1st Battalion, 36th Regiment, “as a particular mark of their esteem”.

Source & Copyright: Royal Armouries 




@ everyone who might be interested in courting me: don’t waste our mutual time with flowers and sweets, buddy. Bring me a ridiculously lavish sabre instead.

art-of-swords:

The Burne Sword

  • Swordsmith: Richard Johnston
  • Place and date of manufacture: English, London
  • Dated: 1807–9

Presented to Colonel Robert Burne by the officers of the 1st Battalion, 36th Regiment, “as a particular mark of their esteem”.

Source & Copyright: Royal Armouries 

@ everyone who might be interested in courting me: don’t waste our mutual time with flowers and sweets, buddy. Bring me a ridiculously lavish sabre instead.
Monday, September 10, 2012

art-of-swords:

Italian 4-ring Rapier

  • Dated: 1620
  • Dimensions: overall length 47 3/4”

Symmetrical hilt composed of round and faceted flat-section bars; featuring 4 up-angled rings and an additional looping bar joining the faceted knucklebow (several braised repairs at the junctions). The smallest ring with a riveted plate stamped with geometric design; knucklebow finial decorated ensuite.

Quillon block with chiseled radiating lines; recurved faceted quillons. Faceted ovoid pommel with button; grip with original iron turks heads and later grip wrap of iron, silver, and brass wire. Diamond-section 39 3/4” blade with short central fuller, stamped with indistinct markings and a cross just below the fuller.

Source & Copyright: Antique Weapon Store