Saturday, April 19, 2014
taocder:

The Church Militant, 15 September 1779 
A priest reads a sermon from his text placed on top of two drums to a sleeping officer in a chair, and a group of bored soldiers of the militia in uniform. 

taocder:

The Church Militant, 15 September 1779 

A priest reads a sermon from his text placed on top of two drums to a sleeping officer in a chair, and a group of bored soldiers of the militia in uniform. 

dieweltvongestern:

frontiersmen from the Habsburg Millitary frontier in today’s Croatia: 1. an Austrian officer and frontiersmen from 2. Slavonia 3. Lika 4. Banovina/Banija 5. Varaždin and 6. Karlovac counties. image from 1742.

dieweltvongestern:

frontiersmen from the Habsburg Millitary frontier in today’s Croatia: 1. an Austrian officer and frontiersmen from 2. Slavonia 3. Lika 4. Banovina/Banija 5. Varaždin and 6. Karlovac counties. image from 1742.

taocder:
Corporal Cartouch teaching Miss Camp-Love her Manual Exercise, John Collett, 1780. (Source)
A soldier drilling an attractive young woman, tilting up her chin while she stands shouldering a musket on the right, mimicked by a monkey sitting on a music book and holding a flute, with a dog and a drummer boy, books and a vase on a chest-of-drawers, a picture of a young female archer and another of the ‘Camp of Winchester’ on the wall behind.

taocder:

Corporal Cartouch teaching Miss Camp-Love her Manual Exercise, John Collett, 1780. (Source)

A soldier drilling an attractive young woman, tilting up her chin while she stands shouldering a musket on the right, mimicked by a monkey sitting on a music book and holding a flute, with a dog and a drummer boy, books and a vase on a chest-of-drawers, a picture of a young female archer and another of the ‘Camp of Winchester’ on the wall behind.

Friday, April 18, 2014
petitpoulailler:

geisterseher: From the Jane Johnson Manuscript Nursery Library (c. 1740-1759) at Indiana University.

petitpoulailler:

geisterseher: From the Jane Johnson Manuscript Nursery Library (c. 1740-1759) at Indiana University.

gunneratlarge:

bantarleton:

The Recruiting Sergeant by John Collet c. 1767

"For a soldier I listed, to grow great in fame. And be shot at for 12-pence a day"

A lively scene outside a public house which includes all generations from young to old. The central figures are a uniformed sergeant with his arm around a young man, a potential recruit. The Sergeant appears to be paying the king’s shilling, an earnest payment given to recruits of the British Army and the Royal Navy of the 18th and 19th centuries. The expression “to take the King’s shilling” (or the Queen’s shilling as the case may be) meant that a man agreed to serve as a soldier or sailor. Recruiters of the time used all sorts of tricks, most involving strong drink, to press the shilling on unsuspecting victims. The man did not formally become a soldier until attested before a Justice of the Peace, and could still escape his fate by paying his recruiter “smart money” before attestation.

Tricking people may be a 19th century happening, but it doesn’t seem to happen in the 18th century. I have read hundreds of depositions from men in front of Justices of the Peace and in none of them were forced or was trickery used.  Even on 6 pence a day, the armies of England in the 18th century were not the scum and the dregs of the armies of the 19th century. Serving in the army was for life, and at the end, and for a pension. A pension being something no other profession offered. In the 18th century, the army was a good profession and decent people joined up to serve.

The Duke of Lorraine and Imperial troops crossing the Rhine at Strasbourg, 1744 - Johann Tobias Sonntag (1716-1774)

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Austrian officers of the I.R. Starhemberg, 1759 - Plate by A. Yezhov

Austrian officers of the I.R. Starhemberg, 1759 - Plate by A. Yezhov

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
When they [the Turks] make water, they squat down like Women, for fear some drops of urine should fall into their breeches. To prevent this evil, they squeeze the part very carefully, and rub the Head of it against the Wall ; and one may see the stones worn in several places by this custom. To make themselves sport, the Christians smear the stones sometimes with Indian Pepper, and the Root call’d Calfs-foot or some other hot Plants, which frequently causes an Inflammation in such as happen to use the Stone. As the Pain is very sharp, the poor Turks commonly run for a Cure to those very Christian Surgeons, who were the Authors of all the Mischief : they never fail to tell them it is a very dangerous Case, and that they should be oblig’d perhaps to make an amputation : the Turks, on the contrary, protest and swear they have had no communication with any sort of woman that could be suspected. In short, they wrap up the suffering part in a Linen dipp’d in Oxicrat, tinctur’d with a little Bole-Armenic ; and this they tell them as a great Specifick for this kind of Mischief. from A voyage into the Levant - Containing the antient and modern state of the islands of the archipelago; as also of Constantinople, the coasts of the Black sea, Armenia, Georgia, the frontiers of Persia, and Asia Minor by Joseph Pitton de Tournefort, 1718. original text from book here. (via rumelia)
jaded-mandarin:

Thomas Gainsborough. Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, 1787.

jaded-mandarin:

Thomas Gainsborough. Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, 1787.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
taocder:

Scenes of Everyday Life and People in 1790 (Source) by Thomas Rowlandson. 
Details: 1. A soldier assessing new recruits for the army. 2. A woman driving a phaeton. 3. Couple walking. 4. A solder escorting two women. 5. A tea party. 6. An equestrian about to go on a ride. 7. An industrious woman sewing.  8. A well-dressed man peers at a woman through his eye-glass. 9. A musical interlude with two ladies. 10. An outing in the country.  12. Bird watching or gazing at ships along the seashore? 13. Arrival at an inn, or examining his accounts? 14. Street vendors.

taocder:

Scenes of Everyday Life and People in 1790 (Source) by Thomas Rowlandson.

Details:
1. A soldier assessing new recruits for the army.
image
2. A woman driving a phaeton.
image
3. Couple walking.
image
4. A solder escorting two women.
image
5. A tea party.
image
6. An equestrian about to go on a ride.
image
7. An industrious woman sewing.
image
8. A well-dressed man peers at a woman through his eye-glass.
image
9. A musical interlude with two ladies.
image
10. An outing in the country.
image
12. Bird watching or gazing at ships along the seashore?
image
13. Arrival at an inn, or examining his accounts?
image
14. Street vendors.
image