Saturday, August 2, 2014

Studies have shown that the longer I stay out of Tumblr, the better I feel IRL. You know, not in a constant, simmering state of anger and hate.

Since it unexpectedly turned out I like the feeling of non-anger and non-hate, I’m taking a summer break - for real this time, not another half-assed hiatus that barely survives the night. If you don’t hear from me in two weeks, carry on with your business and let two more pass.

The inbox will be checked every now and then. Skype, Failbook, deviantFart, Twitter and email are keeping the shop open so, if you have something to tell me, head over there.

Maybe I'll resist purchasing it until next month.

  • Brain: You don't need a book on the service history of the Regia Marina during the first world war.
  • Me: What do you mean I don't?
  • Brain: No.
  • Me: ...
  • Brain: No.
  • Me: ...
  • Brain: NO.
  • Me: ...
  • Brain: FOR FUCK'S SAKE, NO.
  • Me: What time does the bookstore open?

Woman segregated by her own family provides elements to take 16 suspected ‘Ndrangheta members into custody

italiansreclaimingitaly:

From ANSA English:

Sixteen suspected ‘Ndrangheta members were taken into pre-charge custody on Thursday as part of an investigation into the Cacciola clan of the Calabrian mafia in Rosarno. The investigation involves accusations of international cocaine trafficking, kidnapping, and forcing people into slavery.

Some of the arrest orders were being carried out in Germany and the Netherlands, besides those in Italy’s Reggio Calabria region. The investigation began in 2006 and gathered speed when a woman from the clan came forward alleging that she was reduced to slavery after being held responsible by the clan for her husband’s suicide.

The “woman” is Giuseppina Multari, wife of Antonio Cacciola, who committed suicide in 2005. She was held responsible of her husband’s death by his family and basically kidnapped with her three children until she managed to have a letter delivered to her father to tell him about her situation. She then became a collaboratrice di giustizia and went under the protection of the Carabinieri (to which her father brought the letter he received). She provided information about the Cacciola clan, the cocaine trafficking that was going on between Italy and Germany and the weapons held by the clan in hidden locations. 

Giuseppina is one of the many “mafia princesses” who turned away from their own families and rejected a life of crime. She was segregated into her own house by her relatives, who kept her slave through pysicological violence and by threatening of taking her daughters away. She tried to kill herself in the sea after one year, but was rescued by her brother Angelo, who then “vanished” mysteriously (translation: he was killed). Her statements have provided the police with hundreds of pages about the criminal activity in Calabria and the cocaine that came from Dusseldorf to the Italian market.

Giuseppina is the umpteenth victim on a long list of wives, daughters, mothers, women, who were harmed by their own families because they decided to step away from organized crime. The Cacciola clan is not new to such incredibly cruel behaviour: Maria Concetta Cacciola died in August 2011 after drinking acid. She was a witness for justice up until a few days before her death, when she left the protection program and went back to Rosarno (which is not a hidden village away from civilization, it’s a rather big city in Calabria where many people live). Her apparent suicide was overturned by the autopsy and the investigation, which proved that it was a planned murder and her whole family is now in jail. Even her mother, whom Maria Concetta entrusted her own children to for protection.

There are no mafia princesses. Women born into organized crime are either monstrous criminals who harm their own relatives or brave heroes who risk everything for the sake of a better life. They commit crimes today, they die today, they are arrested and all of these things happen right before our eyes. There is nothing to romanticize.

Friday, August 1, 2014

imalegionnaire:

TODAY IN HISTORY

1 August 1944

Warsaw Uprising begins

An illustration by JOB of the Marquis de Saint-Pern, commander of the regiment of the Grenadiers de France, encouraging his men as they stood in the open under heavy enemy fire at the battle of Minden, 1 August 1759:

Not wishing them to fall back, this officer rode slowly down the front of the line with his snuff-box in his hand and, taking no notice of the bullets, said, “Well, my boys, what’s the matter? Eh, cannon? Well, it kills you, it kills you, that’s all, my boys; march on, and never mind it!”.
(Sir Lees Knowles, Minden and the Seven Years War, p. 25)

Among the French officers of this unit killed on this day, there was the Marquis de Lafayette, lieutenant-colonel and father of the Lafayette of the American revolutionary war:

Ce dernier [Lafayette] éprouva un effet physique bien extraordinaire, au commencement de la cannonade: un tremblement universel agita ses nerfs; mais il sut de roidir contre cet effet fâcheux, en se tenant très-exactement à son poste, appuyé sur le fusil dont il était armé, afin de diminuer son agitation. Il demandait pardon aux grenadiers qu’il comandait de l’effet naturel qu’il éprouvait, et auquel il sut résister, jusqu’au moment où un boulet de canon le partagea par la moitié du corps.
(Mémoires autographes de M. le Prince de Montbarey, Vol. 1, p. 176)

An illustration by JOB of the Marquis de Saint-Pern, commander of the regiment of the Grenadiers de France, encouraging his men as they stood in the open under heavy enemy fire at the battle of Minden, 1 August 1759:

Not wishing them to fall back, this officer rode slowly down the front of the line with his snuff-box in his hand and, taking no notice of the bullets, said, “Well, my boys, what’s the matter? Eh, cannon? Well, it kills you, it kills you, that’s all, my boys; march on, and never mind it!”.

(Sir Lees Knowles, Minden and the Seven Years War, p. 25)

Among the French officers of this unit killed on this day, there was the Marquis de Lafayette, lieutenant-colonel and father of the Lafayette of the American revolutionary war:

Ce dernier [Lafayette] éprouva un effet physique bien extraordinaire, au commencement de la cannonade: un tremblement universel agita ses nerfs; mais il sut de roidir contre cet effet fâcheux, en se tenant très-exactement à son poste, appuyé sur le fusil dont il était armé, afin de diminuer son agitation. Il demandait pardon aux grenadiers qu’il comandait de l’effet naturel qu’il éprouvait, et auquel il sut résister, jusqu’au moment où un boulet de canon le partagea par la moitié du corps.

(Mémoires autographes de M. le Prince de Montbarey, Vol. 1, p. 176)

A revolution is not a painless march to the gates of freedom and justice. It is a struggle between rage and hope, between the temptation to destroy and the desire to build. Its temperament is desperate. It is a tormented response to the past, to all that has happened, the recalled and unrecalled injustices—for the memory of a revolution reaches much further back than the memory of its protagonists. Hisham Matar on Libya: http://nyr.kr/1n7I6mX (via newyorker)
Thursday, July 31, 2014
echosilo:

Vanitie, International Yacht Races, 1934. Margaret Bourke-White

echosilo:

Vanitie, International Yacht Races, 1934. Margaret Bourke-White

animus-inviolabilis:

Coast Scenes near Dunbar
John Ruskin
1847

animus-inviolabilis:

Coast Scenes near Dunbar

John Ruskin

1847