Friday, August 1, 2014
An illustration by JOB of the Marquis de Saint-Pern, commander of the regiment of the Grenadiers de France, encouraging his men as they stood in the open under heavy enemy fire at the battle of Minden, 1 August 1759:

Not wishing them to fall back, this officer rode slowly down the front of the line with his snuff-box in his hand and, taking no notice of the bullets, said, “Well, my boys, what’s the matter? Eh, cannon? Well, it kills you, it kills you, that’s all, my boys; march on, and never mind it!”.
(Sir Lees Knowles, Minden and the Seven Years War, p. 25)

Among the French officers of this unit killed on this day, there was the Marquis de Lafayette, lieutenant-colonel and father of the Lafayette of the American revolutionary war:

Ce dernier [Lafayette] éprouva un effet physique bien extraordinaire, au commencement de la cannonade: un tremblement universel agita ses nerfs; mais il sut de roidie contre cet effet fâcheux, en se tenant très-exactement à son poste, appuyé sur le fusil dont il était armé, afin de diminuer son agitation. Il demandait pardon aux grenadiers qu’il comandait de l’effet naturel qu’il éprouvait, et auquel il sut résister, jusqu’au moment où un boulet de canon le partagea par la moitié du corps.
(Mémoires autographes de M. le Prince de Montbarey, p. 176)

An illustration by JOB of the Marquis de Saint-Pern, commander of the regiment of the Grenadiers de France, encouraging his men as they stood in the open under heavy enemy fire at the battle of Minden, 1 August 1759:

Not wishing them to fall back, this officer rode slowly down the front of the line with his snuff-box in his hand and, taking no notice of the bullets, said, “Well, my boys, what’s the matter? Eh, cannon? Well, it kills you, it kills you, that’s all, my boys; march on, and never mind it!”.

(Sir Lees Knowles, Minden and the Seven Years War, p. 25)

Among the French officers of this unit killed on this day, there was the Marquis de Lafayette, lieutenant-colonel and father of the Lafayette of the American revolutionary war:

Ce dernier [Lafayette] éprouva un effet physique bien extraordinaire, au commencement de la cannonade: un tremblement universel agita ses nerfs; mais il sut de roidie contre cet effet fâcheux, en se tenant très-exactement à son poste, appuyé sur le fusil dont il était armé, afin de diminuer son agitation. Il demandait pardon aux grenadiers qu’il comandait de l’effet naturel qu’il éprouvait, et auquel il sut résister, jusqu’au moment où un boulet de canon le partagea par la moitié du corps.

(Mémoires autographes de M. le Prince de Montbarey, p. 176)

A revolution is not a painless march to the gates of freedom and justice. It is a struggle between rage and hope, between the temptation to destroy and the desire to build. Its temperament is desperate. It is a tormented response to the past, to all that has happened, the recalled and unrecalled injustices—for the memory of a revolution reaches much further back than the memory of its protagonists. Hisham Matar on Libya: http://nyr.kr/1n7I6mX (via newyorker)
Thursday, July 31, 2014
echosilo:

Vanitie, International Yacht Races, 1934. Margaret Bourke-White

echosilo:

Vanitie, International Yacht Races, 1934. Margaret Bourke-White

animus-inviolabilis:

Coast Scenes near Dunbar
John Ruskin
1847

animus-inviolabilis:

Coast Scenes near Dunbar

John Ruskin

1847

thousand-mares:

This is approximately what became of page 7 of The Cold Castle. The book version has been edited a little for the sake of subtitles, but I like this one better.

thousand-mares:

This is approximately what became of page 7 of The Cold Castle. The book version has been edited a little for the sake of subtitles, but I like this one better.

summerscourtney:

So anyway I am working on a new book of people I hope you hate and are drawn to???

wahnwitzig:

Postcards designed by Juan Ruiz depicting the allied powers, c. 1915

deaddreamers:

best photoset I’ve ever seen

(Source: iammyurl)