Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Ancient theatre of Taormina 

(Source: last-of-the-romans)

thrillingtragedy:

dontrythis-athome:

I’m Italian but I wouldn’t mind in the slightest if some hot guys like these ones wanted to teach me more. In fact, please do.

(x)

I feel it is my duty to provide some translations or verbal expressions that often accompany these gestures. Beware, as most of these are slang (mostly from Rome) and not Standard Italian.

1) “Che cazzo stai a di’?!” or “(che) cazzo dici?”, vaguely equivalent to your “What the fuck are you saying/did you just say?”. Can be used as a dubitative expression even if it’s not referring to a conversation. Like when you’re driving in the traffic and someone tries to surpass you: “MA ‘NDO VAI?”, rigorously in caps, it means, figuratively, “Where do you think you’re going?”.

2) “Chi se ne fotte” or “‘Sti cazzi” or “Nun me ne po’ frega’ de meno”, colourful variations on the “I don’t give a damn” theme. Fun fact: the literal translation of “‘Sti cazzi” is “These cocks”.

3) It’s the “OK” sign, but be careful because some, especially the young ones, could interpret it as a symbolic reference to an orifice, especially if your hand stays still. If you’re in doubt, just say “Perfetto!” or “Daje!” (the “j” is not pronounced as in “just”, it’s more like the “j” of Scandinavian languages or the “ll” sound in the Spanish “tortillas”) or “E annamo!”. The last two are positive, encouraging expressions, similar to “Let’s go” or “Come on”.

4) This is literally called “gesture of the umbrella” (Gesto dell’ombrello) or “fare manichetto” (where “manichetto” refers to the forearm/sleeve, but there’s no exact translation for it). It’s the equivalent of giving the finger and you can easily accompany it with a good “Vaffanculo” (no translation needed, I think) or “Tiè” (“Take this!”) and honestly many more phrases, but I think it works better with silence.

For maximum effect, always remember to emphasize the spelling of all consonants, especially the double ones, and keep the vowels clear and loud. The stress usually lies on the vowel with the apostrophe.
These are all very, very informal expressions so be careful who you’re addressing when you decide to use them. Most importantly: have fun!

vfreie said: Sssssuuuuuuuuppppp. If I met you... fuck it, WHEN I meet you a lot of malvasia will be drunk and many an AU headcanon about King Henry of America and Poland and his lovely wifey Figchen will come into existence. The rest of the world is warned.

ifrija:

I have this dark foreboding that when we sober up, we’ll find the political map of the world distorted, a reasonable number of heads of state assassinated and our families weeping.

Good.

(Source: chromeus)

fyodorpavlov:

"She rides in the crisp air, in the veil between worlds."
New greeting cards are now available in the shop just in time for Halloween! Though, personally, I need witches in my life year round. 
Inspired by the lovely zforzelma.

fyodorpavlov:

"She rides in the crisp air, in the veil between worlds."

New greeting cards are now available in the shop just in time for Halloween! Though, personally, I need witches in my life year round. 

Inspired by the lovely zforzelma.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

fireandwonder:

ccharlesxavier:

i want a show called Man Vs. Wilde where someone is put in the jungle with oscar wilde and has to survive not only the elements but also wilde’s random attacks and massive ego

No. 

Mann vs. Wilde.

Thomas Mann’s pretensiousness and sexual repression vs. Oscar Wilde’s sarcasm and blatant queerness.

Give it to me.

italian-landscapes:

Castello di Lombardia (Lombardy Castle), Enna, Sicilia (Sicily), Italy (1130-1250)

The castle owes its name to a Lombard soldiers’ garrison, that was located there during the Norman rule of Sicily (1061-1250)

Google Maps

historyfan:

A Polish Lancer fights a Prussian Hussar. The actual title of the painting is roughly the same, but due to it being in Polish ive only obtained a rough translation.
By Wojciech Kossak. 1914.

historyfan:

A Polish Lancer fights a Prussian Hussar. The actual title of the painting is roughly the same, but due to it being in Polish ive only obtained a rough translation.

By Wojciech Kossak. 1914.

lordmarlborough:

vfreie:

Officer and lower ranks (I think the man in the middle might be a sergeant) of the Swiss guards regiment commanded by Colonel Jaccaud (also spelled Iacaud), later by Colonel Bavois, in the service of Francesco III d’Este, Duke of Modena.
The date at the bottom right of the image is slightly off the mark, as this regiment was raised in 1742.
Source

The Garde Suisse uniform was Red in the army of the Ancien Regime. The above soldiers are wearing the uniform of the Gardes Francaises.
This is the uniform of the Swiss Guards of the Maison du Roi:



True for the French army, but these men are in the Duchy of Modena, unless the Vinkhuijzen Collection got it all wrong.

lordmarlborough:

vfreie:

Officer and lower ranks (I think the man in the middle might be a sergeant) of the Swiss guards regiment commanded by Colonel Jaccaud (also spelled Iacaud), later by Colonel Bavois, in the service of Francesco III d’Este, Duke of Modena.

The date at the bottom right of the image is slightly off the mark, as this regiment was raised in 1742.

Source

The Garde Suisse uniform was Red in the army of the Ancien Regime. The above soldiers are wearing the uniform of the Gardes Francaises.

This is the uniform of the Swiss Guards of the Maison du Roi:

True for the French army, but these men are in the Duchy of Modena, unless the Vinkhuijzen Collection got it all wrong.
speutschlish:

Prepositions in German! You are the green dot!
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